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USCIRF - Chaldeans and Other Mideast Native Christians Face Extinction
By Guest Reporter :: Tuesday, December 27, 2011 :: 22596 Views :: World News & Odds 'N' Ends

Leonard Leo’s video interview with Terry Jeffrey at CNSNews.com that despite the long-term U.S. military occupations of Iraq and Afghanistan, Christianity may well be wiped out in the region because, as CNSNews put it, of "severe and persistent persecution of Christians there" by Muslims.

During the interview Jeffrey asked “We are looking at two different countries where the United States invaded, occupied, changed their governments in the last decade — Iraq and Afghanistan — where it’s possible Christianity might be eradicated in our lifetime?”

Leo responded, “Yes, and, unfortunately, that is sort of the pattern throughout the Middle Eastern region. The flight of Christians out of the region is unprecedented and it’s increasing year by year. It’s a very, very alarming situation.”

The situation for Chaldeans and other Christians throughout the Mideast is worsening.  In its annual report, USCIRF observed:

Half or more of the pre-2003 Iraqi Christian community is believed to have left the country, with Christian leaders warning that the consequence of this flight may be the end of Christianity in Iraq. ... In 2003, there were thought to be 800,000 to 1.4 million Chaldean Catholics, Assyrian Orthodox, Assyrian Church of the East members, Syriac Orthodox, Armenians (Catholic and Orthodox), Protestants, and Evangelicals in Iraq. Today, community leaders estimate the number of Christians to be around 500,000.

Leo told Jeffrey that the situation for Christians in Afghanistan is grim. The USCIRF report noted:
“Conditions for religious freedom remain exceedingly poor for minority religious communities and dissenting members of the majority faith, despite the presence of U.S. armed forces in Afghanistan for almost 10 years and the substantial investment of lives, resources, and expertise by the United States and the international community. The 2004 Afghan constitution has effectively established Islamic law as the law of the land.”

Many point to America’s disregard to human rights over their desire for control.  The critics point to how the U.S. helped hammer out a constitution for the new Afghanistan.  In that constitution, there is a repugnancy clause, which basically says anything that’s inconsistent with Sharia principles is violation of this constitution.

That clause, no matter what else is in the constitution, basically forecloses the kind of reform that is needed for human rights, because any extreme religious sub-sect can impose its radical view of Sharia and enshrine it in the constitutional system in Afghanistan.   “If that’s the kind of government system they have, there is no real way to ensure freedom of religion broadly speaking. There’s no way to ensure that religious minorities are going to have freedom in law,” says Leo.

Leo called the process of drafting the Afghan constitution "a disaster." He noted that there is just one remaining Jew in Afghanistan and that the last Christian church in the country was closed.

Pakistan, which still has a significant Christian population, is among the worst nations, according to Leo, in its persecution of Christians and its insistence upon strict Islamic blasphemy laws. Leo said that he understands that the U.S. relationship with Pakistan is complex, but that if we cannot protect the rights of Christians or even of Muslims who do not accept the religious Islamic view of other Pakistani Muslims, then the purpose for our help to the Pakistani government is undermined.

Leo adds that the American government failed to have a clear plan to exit Iraq properly and without lingering killing of minority groups.  “The potential for tragedy is significant,” Leo says.  In fact, when asked if Christianity might be eradicated in Afghanistan after American troops are withdraw, he said “yes.”

When asked by Jeffrey if the “facts” upon which the commission was basing its report were in dispute, Leo said that there was generally agreement on the level of religious freedom. While Leo noted that the State Department had a broader agenda than his commission, he said that the State Department did not question the findings.

Leo warned that more than just the Christian faith, which has historically been an integral part of the region, will unravel if the Christian presence ends. Islam itself will become increasing narrow and totalitarian, he said, and deviating Muslims will be treated as apostates.

Sacred Heart Parish, MI USA

 

Sacred Heart Parish
310 W. Seven Mile. Rd.
Detroit, MI 48203
Tel: (313) 368-6214
Fax: (313) 891-0132

The parish was established by Rev. Jacob Yasso in 1973

Rev. Jacob Yasso

Rev. Jacob Yasso was born in the village of Telkaif, Iraq.  After completing high school he was recruited to Rome and Urbaniana University where he completed his Masters Degree in philosophy and Theology.  Fr. Yasso was ordained a priest in 1960 and served the Diocese of Mosul, where he worked in the public school system. Fr. Yasso was also asked by the Patriarch to teach at the Patriarchal Seminary in Baghdad, where he served as administrator, professor of philosophy and religious life, and rector of the minor seminary. 

In 1964, Fr. Yasso was appointed to the United States to serve the growing Chaldean community in Detroit.  There he served as the 4th Pastor of Mother of God Parish.  .  In 1972, the Patriarch charged Fr. Yasso with building a new parish for the Chaldeans in Detroit.  In taking great pains to care for the community Fr. Yasso accelerated the development of a new church and community center.  In 1975, Fr. Yasso completed the development of Sacred Heart Parish in Detroit and shortly thereafter he added the Chaldean Center of America in 1980, 

A few years later in 1982, Fr. Yasso was asked to assist the late Fr. Kattoula at St. Peter’s Church in San Diego, CA.  Before long, Fr. Yasso was once again recruited to Rome to study new Canon Law of the Church.  While in Rome Fr. Yasso completed his third Masters Degree in Church Law, making him the only Chaldean priest trained in Canon Law. 

In 1988, the Patriarch and Vatican authorities asked Fr. Yasso to travel to Canada and establish a parish and community center.  While there he served as a Tribunal Judge for the Archdiocese of Toronto.  Four years later Fr. Yasso returned to Sacred Heart church in Detroit to help care for the remaining Chaldean community residence in the Detroit area.  To this day, Fr. Yasso continues to serve as the parish pastor creating activities and advising the City of Detroit on community related matters. 

Fr. Yasso is a member of the International WYCLIF Bible translators, since 1975, and has completed the translation of the New Testament from Greek and Aramaic into Arabic and spoken Chaldean.   The publication of his scholarly work is set to be released soon.