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5 Ways to Stay Safe in Sports
By Sue Garmo :: Saturday, April 28, 2012 :: 42685 Views :: Health & Fitness, Sports, Art, and Entertainment

 

Summer sports are a wonderful outlet for Chaldean kids to learn the value of teamwork, build friendships and get fresh air and exercise.  And while Chaldean parents want their kids to have a good time and succeed at sports, they should also teach them the importance of playing sports safely.


Kids' growing bodies are simply more susceptible to injury than adults'.  Chaldean health professionals estimate that one out of every thirteen Chaldean children under the age of fifteen will suffer a sports injury this summer.  Yet, a lot of them are preventable by following five rules of sports safety. If Chaldean boys and Chaldean girls want to win at sports in the long run, they must take steps to protect their bodies.

Here are five ways Chaldeans can do just that.

5: Stretch Before & After
After the game, Chaldean kids may want to rush home and celebrate the win, but their bodies deserve better than that. They should stretch out worn, tired muscles before heading to the victory party. That will also reduce the chances of post-game injuries and get them in better shape for the next match.

4: Wear the Proper Equipment
Athletes wear uniforms and sports gear for good reason: They make it easier to tell opponents from team members and protect players' bodies during the game. Think about all of the padding that football players pack on. Without it, their bodies probably couldn't withstand the beating they endure between the end zones. And you can bet that any NFL player worth his salt wouldn't play for a minute without the recommended gear.

Likewise, when it comes to sports safety, Chaldeans ought to wear the right stuff. For instance, baseball players should put on their protective helmets when at bat. Also, young athletes should make sure that their equipment fits.

It may be fun to wear your older brother or sisters safety gear, but it can contribute to the danger.  A pair of shin guards that barely reaches above the ankles won't do much good when a soccer ball strikes.
If Chaldean kids wear glasses or participate in a sport that could injure their eyes, they should consider wearing protective eyewear.  And if your kids aren't sure whether something fits or how to it put on properly, you or they shouldn't hesitate to ask someone for help.   

3: Keep Your Head in the Game
To properly play a game, whether football, badminton or even Monopoly, people first have to learn the rules. By understanding where to be, what to do and what to expect during the course of play, players can avoid accidental collisions and injuries. Then, once they're out on the field, kids should pay attention to what's going on around them. They should especially listen to coaches and teammates -- they're the extra eyes and ears to keep other teammates where they ought to be. Not only will that reduce the chance of getting hurt or hurting someone else, kids will also play better.

2: Stay Hydrated
When exercising or playing an active sport, the body stays cooled off by sweating. However, if people lose too many fluids or don't drink enough, they could become dehydrated, which could lead to muscle spasms, heat stroke, kidney failure and other dangerous health effects. That's why it's important to stay hydrated during sports practices and games.

Chaldean doctors recommends drinking 8 fluid ounces every 20 minutes, if not more often. That way, athletes can replenish all of the water that they've been sweating out.

If kids become hot and sweaty and start to feel dizzy, weak, confused or nauseous, they're body may be sending signals of dehydration. They should alert a coach, take a break and drink some water. In hot weather, it's also good to drink beverages with electrolytes to restore sodium and potassium levels in the body.

1: Follow the Rules
As parents and teachers have repeated time again, rules are in place for a reason. In addition to knowing how to get points on the board for the team, young players should also be aware of what's not allowed. For instance, basketball players can't push their opponents in order to snag the ball. After all, if every game was an intense contact sport, there would probably be too many injured players on the sidelines. It's the parents and coach's responsibility to teach players about such rules and regulations, and it's the athlete's duty to listen up accordingly.

Kids shouldn't just think about playing fast and hard; to succeed, they have to be smart and use their heads. That way, children will raise the odds of being healthy and strong for the next game.
Sacred Heart Parish, MI USA

 

Sacred Heart Parish
310 W. Seven Mile. Rd.
Detroit, MI 48203
Tel: (313) 368-6214
Fax: (313) 891-0132

The parish was established by Rev. Jacob Yasso in 1973

Rev. Jacob Yasso

Rev. Jacob Yasso was born in the village of Telkaif, Iraq.  After completing high school he was recruited to Rome and Urbaniana University where he completed his Masters Degree in philosophy and Theology.  Fr. Yasso was ordained a priest in 1960 and served the Diocese of Mosul, where he worked in the public school system. Fr. Yasso was also asked by the Patriarch to teach at the Patriarchal Seminary in Baghdad, where he served as administrator, professor of philosophy and religious life, and rector of the minor seminary. 

In 1964, Fr. Yasso was appointed to the United States to serve the growing Chaldean community in Detroit.  There he served as the 4th Pastor of Mother of God Parish.  .  In 1972, the Patriarch charged Fr. Yasso with building a new parish for the Chaldeans in Detroit.  In taking great pains to care for the community Fr. Yasso accelerated the development of a new church and community center.  In 1975, Fr. Yasso completed the development of Sacred Heart Parish in Detroit and shortly thereafter he added the Chaldean Center of America in 1980, 

A few years later in 1982, Fr. Yasso was asked to assist the late Fr. Kattoula at St. Peter’s Church in San Diego, CA.  Before long, Fr. Yasso was once again recruited to Rome to study new Canon Law of the Church.  While in Rome Fr. Yasso completed his third Masters Degree in Church Law, making him the only Chaldean priest trained in Canon Law. 

In 1988, the Patriarch and Vatican authorities asked Fr. Yasso to travel to Canada and establish a parish and community center.  While there he served as a Tribunal Judge for the Archdiocese of Toronto.  Four years later Fr. Yasso returned to Sacred Heart church in Detroit to help care for the remaining Chaldean community residence in the Detroit area.  To this day, Fr. Yasso continues to serve as the parish pastor creating activities and advising the City of Detroit on community related matters. 

Fr. Yasso is a member of the International WYCLIF Bible translators, since 1975, and has completed the translation of the New Testament from Greek and Aramaic into Arabic and spoken Chaldean.   The publication of his scholarly work is set to be released soon.