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Chaldean Flame-Seared Asian Spicy Kebabs
By Ann Bahri :: Sunday, May 6, 2012 :: 44634 Views :: Living & Lifestyle, Community & Culture
Since many Chaldeans have been forced to flee their land, it is not uncommon to find Chaldeans experimenting on new foods that are reminiscent of home with an accepting flavor of their new lands.  The new foods are often a mixture that includes traditional Chaldean meals or cooking styles adapted to their host countries.  

The term shish kebab comes from the word kebab, which originally meant fried not grilled meat. The Arabic word was derived from Aramaic kabbābā, which has its origins in Akkadian kabābu meaning "to burn, char".

Kebabs were a natural solution for Chaldean nomadic tribes. Unusual meats were marinated not only to tenderize, but also to get rid of some of the gamey flavor.  Skewers were easy to find in the wilderness as useful utensils for both revolving the meat and easy eating.  

In America, younger Chaldeans have learned to turn Mom’s traditional cooking into an assortment of new dishes.  Try this flame-seared Asian spicy kebab that has a sweet and spicy kick. 

Ingredients

  • 1½ lbs. rib eye steaks (about half inch thick)
  • 1½ tsp. ground cumin
  • 1½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tbs. ground turmeric
  • 3 tbs. soy sauce
  • 3 tbs. vegetable oil
  • 3 tbs. light brown sugar
  • 2 tbs. ground coriander

Directions

1) Cut steaks into ½ inch cubes (do not trim fat).  Place in mixing bowl.  Stir in brown sugar, coriander, turmeric, cumin, pepper, soy sauce, and oil.  Let beef marinate in refrigerator, covered, for at least 2 hours.

2) Drain beef cubes; discard marinade.  Thread beef onto skewers and refrigerate until ready to grill.  

3) Preheat grill to high.  When ready to cook, brush grill grate clean and apply thin coat of oil.  Arrange skewers on the grill and cook to taste (usually 1 to 2 minutes per side for medium-rare, a little longer for medium.

Chaldean shish kebabs have expanded into most cultures in some form or another. Oriental cultures have satay, which are roasted skewered meats served with a dipping sauce usually made with peanuts.  Japan has yakitori, which is grilled skewered fowl. In France, they are called brochettes, meaning "skewer."

 

Sacred Heart Parish, MI USA

 

Sacred Heart Parish
310 W. Seven Mile. Rd.
Detroit, MI 48203
Tel: (313) 368-6214
Fax: (313) 891-0132

The parish was established by Rev. Jacob Yasso in 1973

Rev. Jacob Yasso

Rev. Jacob Yasso was born in the village of Telkaif, Iraq.  After completing high school he was recruited to Rome and Urbaniana University where he completed his Masters Degree in philosophy and Theology.  Fr. Yasso was ordained a priest in 1960 and served the Diocese of Mosul, where he worked in the public school system. Fr. Yasso was also asked by the Patriarch to teach at the Patriarchal Seminary in Baghdad, where he served as administrator, professor of philosophy and religious life, and rector of the minor seminary. 

In 1964, Fr. Yasso was appointed to the United States to serve the growing Chaldean community in Detroit.  There he served as the 4th Pastor of Mother of God Parish.  .  In 1972, the Patriarch charged Fr. Yasso with building a new parish for the Chaldeans in Detroit.  In taking great pains to care for the community Fr. Yasso accelerated the development of a new church and community center.  In 1975, Fr. Yasso completed the development of Sacred Heart Parish in Detroit and shortly thereafter he added the Chaldean Center of America in 1980, 

A few years later in 1982, Fr. Yasso was asked to assist the late Fr. Kattoula at St. Peter’s Church in San Diego, CA.  Before long, Fr. Yasso was once again recruited to Rome to study new Canon Law of the Church.  While in Rome Fr. Yasso completed his third Masters Degree in Church Law, making him the only Chaldean priest trained in Canon Law. 

In 1988, the Patriarch and Vatican authorities asked Fr. Yasso to travel to Canada and establish a parish and community center.  While there he served as a Tribunal Judge for the Archdiocese of Toronto.  Four years later Fr. Yasso returned to Sacred Heart church in Detroit to help care for the remaining Chaldean community residence in the Detroit area.  To this day, Fr. Yasso continues to serve as the parish pastor creating activities and advising the City of Detroit on community related matters. 

Fr. Yasso is a member of the International WYCLIF Bible translators, since 1975, and has completed the translation of the New Testament from Greek and Aramaic into Arabic and spoken Chaldean.   The publication of his scholarly work is set to be released soon.