Wednesday, November 22, 2017
St. Thomas News & Information
Latest News & Information

Current Articles | Archives | Search


Community & Culture

The growth and decline of the Aramaic language
By Sabah Hajjar :: 20584 Views :: Article Rating :: Community & Culture, Chaldean Justice League

The Associated Press writes that the Syrian government sent reinforcements Friday to the ancient, predominantly Christian village of Maaloula, where rebels have battled regime troops this week. Maaloula, a scenic village of about 3,300 perched high in the mountains, is one of the few places in the world where residents still speak a version of Aramaic, the language of biblical times believed to have been used by Jesus.

A look at the growth and decline of the Aramaic language through the centuries:

Read More..
Chaldean Architectural Influences Throughout Iraq
By Bedre Konja :: 18650 Views :: Article Rating :: Community & Culture

For years, Western media has only depicted one kind of reality of Baghdad.  The images broadcast an unending sample of rubble and wreckage as the city's true and only condition.  It is easy to believe the images given the decades of war.   The world has been made to believe Baghdad is in a constant saturate of fractured, blown-apart, gouged-out landscape and buildings.

To see beyond the biased eyes of media one will find instead a historic city that perseveres and has clung to its wonderfully amalgamated heritage with tenacity.

Chaldean architects have played a major role in influencing the world with their enduring display of artistic architectural resourcefulness. Since the cradle of civilization began to form, the kingdoms of Chaldea, which ruled the Tigro-Euphrates valley, began to build.  The scarcity of timber and the lack of good building-stone except in the limestone tablelands and more distant mountains of upper Mesopotamia, the abundance of lay, and the flatness of the country, imposed upon the builders restrictions of conception, form, and material.  

Nonetheless, what emerged from such limited and harsh conditions was nothing short of remarkable.  The Chaldeans had attained a high civilization before 4000 B.C., and had for centuries maintained fixed institutions and practiced the arts and sciences.
Read More..
Chaldean Flame-Seared Asian Spicy Kebabs
By Ann Bahri :: 28595 Views :: Article Rating :: Living & Lifestyle, Community & Culture
Since many Chaldeans have been forced to flee their land, it is not uncommon to find Chaldeans experimenting on new foods that are reminiscent of home with an accepting flavor of their new lands.  The new foods are often a mixture that includes traditional Chaldean meals or cooking styles adapted to their host countries.  

The term shish kebab comes from the word kebab, which originally meant fried not grilled meat. The Arabic word was derived from Aramaic kabbābā, which has its origins in Akkadian kabābu meaning "to burn, char".

Kebabs were a natural solution for Chaldean nomadic tribes. Unusual meats were marinated not only to tenderize, but also to get rid of some of the gamey flavor.  Skewers were easy to find in the wilderness as useful utensils for both revolving the meat and easy eating.  

In America, younger Chaldeans have learned to turn Mom’s traditional cooking into an assortment of new dishes.  Try this flame-seared Asian spicy kebab that has a sweet and spicy kick.
Read More..
On the Job: He's Living the American Dream
By Guest Reporter :: 25483 Views :: Article Rating :: Community & Culture, Business & Finance
   Doug Williams of the santee.patch.com 

 

For Lee Wazzi, co-owner of Santee's Lake's Market Liquor & Deli, the journey from Iraq to the United States opened doors of peace and opportunity for which he will always be grateful.

  As he sits at a small desk in a back room at Lake’s Market Liquor & Deli, Lee Wazzi talks about his long life’s journey and counts himself a lucky man.

At age 42, he’s exactly where he wants to be.

A native of Iraq, Wazzi and his family and close friends dreamed of coming to America so they could live in peace, work hard and have a chance at success.

While many Americans don’t take time to count their blessings, Wazzi does every day. To him, the American dream isn’t just a theoretical concept. It’s his life.
Read More..
Chaldean Catholic Bishop Asks the West, Are We Making Good Use of Our Freedom?
By Guest Reporter :: 46317 Views :: Article Rating :: Community & Culture, Chaldean Churches

The situation in Iran and the challenge issued by this courageous Chaldean Bishop should cause us to pause and think as we enter into these Holy Days. This Bishop is correct; a culture without God has no future. He also asks us the right question, what are we doing with our freedoms? Pope Benedict reminds us that "A missionary Church known for proclaiming her message to all peoples must necessarily work for the freedom of the faith. She desires to transmit the gift of the truth that exists for one and all."

 
Chaldean Catholic Bishop Ramzi Garmou
 Chaldean Catholic Bishop
Ramzi Garmou
 

CHESAPEAKE,VA  (Catholic Online) - I recently read a report from Aid to the Church in Need, a Catholic Charity under the guidance of the Holy Father  with a special mission to "help suffering and persecuted faithful worldwide. It was an  interview with the Chaldean Catholic Bishop of Tehran, Ramzi Garmou. He gave the charity a message for  Christians of the West, "Be aware of the value of the freedom that you enjoy."

Here is another excerpt from the report.It can be read in full here.

*****
"He then challenged Western Christians to "make good use of their freedom," asking, "How do you use it in your countries?" He emphasized that they must not become "the slaves of a culture that seeks to drive God out of people's hearts," but rather that they should use their freedom to "propagate respect for human life." A culture without God leads to "death" and has "no future," he said.

"Christians in Iran only represent a small minority, yet "their vitality does not depend on their numbers but on the quality of their faith and their living witness." In their "day-to-day dialogue" with the Muslims, the Christians in Iran "give authentic witness to the values of the Gospels," he continued.

Read More..
Why Chaldean Businesses Fail
By Paul Gori :: 25551 Views :: Article Rating :: Community & Culture, Business & Finance
One of the least understood aspects of entrepreneurship is why small businesses fail, and there’s a simple reason for the confusion: Most of the evidence comes from the entrepreneurs themselves.

We interviewed a number of Chaldean small business entrepreneurs about what they believe is the cause of business failures. 

Some of the Chaldeans we interviewed had business failures themselves; others shared what challenges close friends and family members faced that caused their business to fail.  

The interviewed included a questionnaire, discussion, and follow-up questions in order to gain a better understanding of the challenges.  We sampled 138 Chaldean businesses in California, 43 in Chicago, and 206 in Michigan.  We grouped the common causes in the list below, which does not have any specific order.
Read More..
Chaldeans Rally Community to Vote for Santorum
By Huda Metti :: 27553 Views :: Article Rating :: Community & Culture, Government & Society

Rick Santorum greets the crowd at the St. William Dad Club 23rd Annual Lenter Fish Fry at St. William Catholic Parish in Walled Lake on Friday, February 24, 2012

Michigan, USA – U.S. Presidential candidates see Michigan as a game changer as they try to persuade voters for their support.  “Mitt Romney, a former teen resident of Michigan, thought he all but had Michigan in his wallet.  Quite an elitist and entitled mentality if you ask me,” says Calvin Denha.  “Romney is in the pocket of politicians and really not for the people,” Denha adds.
 
Chaldeans are overwhelmingly turning towards Rick Santorum as their favored candidate.  Chaldean community leaders and Chaldeans politically knowledgeable favor Santorum’s consistency, ability to work with both parties, and experience in government.  Chaldean conservatives love Santorum for his values and integrity.  Chaldean independents and entrepreneurs appreciate Santorum’s understanding of small business challenges and government overreach.  The minority of Chaldean liberals even like Santorum for his fairness, statesmanship, and willingness to listen.

Read More..
Card Playing Chaldeans Question American Freedoms
By Paul Gori :: 33244 Views :: Article Rating :: Community & Culture, Government & Society, Chaldean Justice League

California, USA – “Chaldeans fortunate enough to make it to the land of milk and honey are getting a genuine swig of sour milk and crusty honey,” says Joseph Badoun.  California, El Cajon officials have been in debate on how to deal with Chaldean senior citizens gathering to play cards.  “This whole ordeal is a joke.  These are men in their final years, many of who are church elders, and community fathers playing cards in a community center.”

Badoun may laugh-off the ordeal, but to Chaldean seniors the issue has been unsettling and stressful.  El Cajon officials have launched aggressive crackdowns targeting Chaldeans and there gathering places.   Calls to the Mayor’s office initially went unanswered as to the reason or motive behind the crackdowns. 

Read More..
9 Keys for Better Chaldean Communication
By Rita Abro :: 26876 Views :: Article Rating :: Health & Fitness, Community & Culture

Chaldeans are known for their savvy skills in business and negotiations.  Given communication is a fundamental skill in business and negotiations; you might be tempted to logically conclude Chaldeans must be great communicators. 

Let’s just say Chaldeans communicate differently than most in the West are accustomed to in business and negotiations.  Commonly Chaldeans in communications will be more outspoken, quick, transparent, bold, candid, and gesticulate freely in the discussion. 

This can be intimidating, frustrating, and difficult for non-Chaldeans who are taught a more linear, quiet, subtle, and masked way of sharing ones thoughts and feelings.  

A few weeks ago, I was asked to join two close friends for lunch, John, a Chaldean and Russell, a non-Chaldean (Names have been changed to protect the innocent). Throughout the lunch, I couldn't help but feel there was some sort of communication breakdown.  John would cut Russell off even though he was still talking. John kept offering unwanted advice and opinions, even though Russell was not asking for help. It became quite frustrating just 15 minutes into the conversation.  After 30 minutes, Russell stopped sharing and nodded away to everything John said.

After the lunch, I reflected over the situation.

Read More..
I-75 Wreck in Hazel Park Claims Two Chaldean Lives
By Rita Abro :: 18813 Views :: Article Rating :: Community & Culture

By ROBIN SCHWARTZ
WJBK | myFOXDetroit.com

HAZEL PARK, Mich. (WJBK) - A totaled Lincoln flipped over along I-75 just north of Eight Mile in Hazel Park.  21-year-old Feras Salem and 26-year-old Madonna Jarbo, both from Sterling Heights, were killed at the scene.

I-75 Wreck in Hazel Park Claims Two Lives: MyFoxDETROIT.com

Read More..
Page 1 of 11First   Previous   [1]  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  Next   Last   
St. Thomas, MI USA

St. Thomas Chaldean Catholic Church
6900 Maple Rd.
West Bloomfield, MI 48322
Tel: (248) 788-2460
Fax: (248) 788-2153

Founding Pastor:
Rev. Hanna Cheikho

Current Pastor:
Rev. Frank Kalabat

Parochial Vicar:
Rev. Jirjis Abrahim

Rev. Emmanuel Rayes, Retired  


Rev. Frank Kalabat
 

Rev. Frank Kalabat was born in 1970 in San Diego, California and entered St. Francis Seminary of San Diego, California.  The admission to the Catholic seminary made him the first born U.S. Chaldean to enter an American seminary.  In 1992, Fr. Kalabat continued his studies at Sacred Heart Major Seminary in Detroit, Michigan.  In July 1995, shortly after graduation he was ordained as priest by His Excellency Bishop Ibrahim N. Ibrahim.  

Fr. Frank chose Mother of God Parish in Southfield, MI. as his first assignment serving the Chaldean community as an associate pastor for half a decade.  In 2001, Fr. Kalabat was elected to serve as Pastor of St. Tomas Parish in West Bloomfield, Michigan where he remains today.   

Rev. Jirjis Abrahim

Rev. Jirjis Abrahim was born in Telkaif, Iraq in 1942. Upon graduation Fr. Abrahim was admitted to St. Peter Chaldean Seminary in Baghdad, Iraq.  After a decade of studies and numerous degrees, Fr. Abrhim was ordained a priest in 1967.  He chose to continue ministering in Baghdad, Iraq.  There he was appointed the headmaster of the catechism at Mother of Sorrows Cathedral.  Fr. Abrahim also assisted St. Therese Church in Baghdad until 1978.  Afterward he was asked to assist St. Joseph Church in Baghdad and was appointed Parochial Vicar from 1978-1992. 

In 1992, Fr. Abrahim was called upon to assist the growing Chaldean population in Michigan.  Upon his arrival he was assigned to St. Joseph Church in Tory, Michigan.  Two years later Fr. Abrahim was asked to become the pastor of a Parish community in Windsor, Canada  where he remained the parish pastor until 2001.

Continuing demographic changes in Michigan required Fr. Abrahim to return to St. Joseph Parish in Tory as a Parochial Vicar, where he remained until 2006.  In 2006 he was elected to St. Thomas Parish as Parochial Vicar in West Bloomfield, MI. where he currently serves the Chaldean community.

 

Rev. Emmanuel Rayes

Rev. Emmanuel Rays was born in Araden, Iraq in 1930.  He studied at St. John Dominican Seminary and was ordained to the priesthood in 1954.  The Chaldean catholic ambassador ministered in northern Iraq from 1954-1963, in Syria and Lebanon from 1963-1980, and in the United Stated from 1980 to the present day.
 
Form 1980-1983, he was appointed associate pastor at Mother of God Parish in Southfield, Michigan.  From 1983-1989 he served as pastor at Sacred Heart Parish in Detroit, Michigan.  During the early 1990’s he ministered to the Chaldean community in Farmington Hills and was at St. Joseph Parish in Tory where he was Parochial Vicar until 2000.

Although Fr. Rayes retired in 2001, he remains active in serving the community.  He is the author of many articles in Arabic and is the editor-in-chief of the Al Mishal and Al-Tariq magazine.  He has translated and continues to translate many books from French and English into Arabic.