Thursday, October 19, 2017
www.CHALDEAN.org the Official Chaldean Community Website

 

Chaldean Questions
For what in your life do you feel most grateful?

Community Events & Annoucements

Announce your event, activity, or meeting by e-mailing info@chaldean.org



CHALDEAN COMMUNITY POSTINGS





Chaldean Words of Wisdom
The bad news is time flies. The good news is you're the pilot.

www.CHALDEAN.org Factoids
Word of the Day

 

Article of the Day

 

This Day in History

 

Today's Birthday

 

In the News

 

Quote of the Day

Top News and Information
FOR SALE - Michigan Businesses
FOR SALE - SAN DIEGO


Latest News & Information

Current Articles | Archives | Search

The growth and decline of the Aramaic language
By Sabah Hajjar :: Thursday, September 12, 2013 :: 19836 Views :: Community & Culture, Chaldean Justice League

 

The Associated Press writes that the Syrian government sent reinforcements Friday to the ancient, predominantly Christian village of Maaloula, where rebels have battled regime troops this week. Maaloula, a scenic village of about 3,300 perched high in the mountains, is one of the few places in the world where residents still speak a version of Aramaic, the language of biblical times believed to have been used by Jesus.

A look at the growth and decline of the Aramaic language through the centuries:

ANCIENT ROOTS: Aramaic is part of the language family that includes Hebrew and was widely used during the time of Roman conquest in the Holy Land and, many scholars believe, likely the main language of Jesus Christ. Some parts of the Dead Sea Scrolls are written in a form of Aramaic, which had many dialects.

DECLINE: Aramaic use began to fall off as other languages _ such as Arabic _ dominated with the spread of Islam beginning in the 8th century. Aramaic retained a role in the liturgies of some branches of Eastern Christianity.

CURRENT USE: Forms of Aramaic are used in small communities around the Middle East, including Assyrians and Chaldean Christians, but it is considered to be under threat because of emigration and the pressures from dominant languages such as Arabic and Turkish.

info@chaldean.org