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Entries for July 2008

Yaldo(o|u) Chaldean Family Reunion Open Invitation
By Camp Chaldean :: 102843 Views :: Article Rating :: Living & Lifestyle, Sports, Art, and Entertainment, Community & Culture, Camp Chaldean


Michigan, USA - No one would dare refute that Chaldeans often come from large families.  The Chaldean culture values the importance of family virtues and cooperation.   Chaldeans often hold large family gatherings, dinners, and celebrations.  

One family is taking the family gathering up a few notches.  The Yaldo(o|u) family is hosting their 2008 family reunion at Camp Chaldean in Michigan beginning at 1 p.m. on Sunday, July 27.  Nearly a thousand family members are expected to attend the family gathering. 

Saher Yaldo, a leading community entrepreneur and committed volunteer for the Chaldean Voice radio station has been instrumental in the reunion.  “We invite everyone with Yaldo(o|u) blood pulsing through their veins.  This includes all children and grandchildren whose mother or father are Yaldo(o|u), says Saher.

“Guests are also welcome to invite close friends and relatives as well. We will be holding a special Mass for all our guests led by Fr. Basel Yaldo of St. George Church at 4 p.m. and we have games, gifts, and more as well.”

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Sydney Chaldeans at World Youth Day 2008 Share their Joy and Sorrow
By Rita Abro :: 30 Views :: Article Rating :: Religion & Spirituality, Community & Culture, Chaldean Churches

Sydney, AUSTRALIA – Australian Chaldeans in Sydney have been wildly celebrating World Youth Day.  The excitement, exhilaration, and energy has been intoxicating says Joshua Shami, a Chaldean pilgrim from Europe.  Chaldean youth from around the world have gathered in Sydney in celebration of World Youth Day. 

“We continue to pray for our Chaldean brothers and sisters stuck in Iraq,” says Shami.  For many Chaldeans in Austrialia, the joy of welcoming Pope Benedict XVI to the World Youth Day celebration was dampened by the absence of a Chaldean Catholic delegation from Iraq.  “For months people have been working on getting the Iraqi Delegation to Sydney, but it is one thing after another stopping them.” 

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Ur of the Chaldees
By Amer Hedow :: 70036 Views :: Article Rating :: Community & Culture

UR of the Chaldees was the port of CHALDEA (Babylonia), a major trade and commerce post.  Citizens of the region along with dwellers on the gulf with distant countries of India , Ethiopia , and Egypt. Change in economics and political power left the port abandoned about 500 B.C., but long continued to be a sacred city.

UR means light, or the moon city, a city of the Chaldees, the largest city of SHINAR or Northern CHALDEA, and the principal commercial centre of the country as well as the centre of political power.  It stood near the mouth of the Euphrates River, on its western bank, and is represented by the mounds (of bricks cemented by bitumen) of El-Mugheir, i.e., "The Bitumined," or "The Town of Bitumen," now 150 miles from the sea and some 6 miles from the Euphrates River, a little above the point where it receives the Shat el-Hie from the Tigris River. It was formerly a maritime city, as the waters of the Chaldean Gulf (mistakenly called Persian Gulf ) reached thus far inland.

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Chaldean Antiquity in Review
By Amer Hedow :: 35787 Views :: Article Rating :: Community & Culture

Chaldea is the land bordering the Persian Gulf that gave its name to the ruling dynasty and thus became a synonym for Babylonia itself.  The tribal territory covering the southern marshes and coastal plains of ancient Iraq bordering the Persian Gulf was called by outsiders “Chaldean land” after the name of the tribes inhabiting the area. This Babylonian name was followed by the Greek, while the Hebrew followed an old dialect form.

The origin of the Chaldeans is often mixed, but scholars suspect the tribe may well be in the west, or else branches of the tribal family moved there (cf. Job 1:17). The general name for the area is unknown, since Chaldean tribes were part of Sumer (SHINAR). Qualification of Abraham’s home city UR as “of the Chaldeans” (Gen. 11:28, 31; 15:7; as later Neh. 9:7; cf. Acts 7:4) was used as a description to distinguish the city from other places with a similar name, Ur`.

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Australia Denies Visas to Iraqi Chaldean WYD Pilgrims
By Rita Abro :: 130429 Views :: Article Rating :: Religion & Spirituality, Community & Culture, Government & Society, Chaldean Churches

The Catholic News Agency reports that the Australian government has denied visas to dozens of Chaldean World Youth Day pilgrims from Iraq.  Australian officials say they are concerned that participants will not return home and instead will seek asylum in Australia. One Chaldean Catholic priest called the decision “a slap at young people who wanted to go to witness to the faith and the joy of the church’s living in Iraq despite sufferings.”

Initially the Australian government denied visas for nearly 170 pilgrims, allowing only ten visas to aspiring World Youth Day participants, the SIR News Agency says. According to the website Baghdadhope, there are now only about 30 total visas available that will be granted “in extremis.”

Father Rayan P. Atto, parish priest of Mar Qardagh Church in Erbil, told SIR News Agency that the concerns about asylum seekers were unfounded, arguing that, “for young Christian Iraqis, taking part in the WYD in Sydney was not a way to leave their country.”

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Research Proves that Being Multilingual is Better
By Huda Metti :: 100358 Views :: Article Rating :: Living & Lifestyle, Career & Education, Community & Culture, Science & Technology

Chaldeans who are bilingual or Multilingual have an advantage over the rest of us, and not just in terms of communication skills. The multilingual brain develops more densely, giving it an advantage in various abilities and skills, according to new research.

According to the 2002 U.S. Census, more than 7.5 million children between the ages of 5 and 17 (about 14 %) speak a language other than English at home and the number of bilingual speakers is expected to increase in the coming years.

Most children have the capacity and facility to learn two or more languages. Research suggests there are advantages to being bilingual, such as, linguistic and metalinguistic abilities and cognitive flexibility, such as, concept formation, divergent thinking and general reasoning and verbal abilities.

Researchers from the Department of Imaging Neuroscience and experts from the Fondazione Santa Lucia in Rome researched brain densities of bilingual people. They recruited 25 people who speak one language, 25 who learned a second European language before age 5, and 33 who became bilingual between ages 10 and 15. 

All the participants spoke English as their primary language. Those who had learned a second language later in life had practiced it regularly for at least five years.

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